In today’s world, if a business does not have a website, they are already behind the curve against their competition. Statistics have shown that better than 85 percent of consumers are searching for and comparing local businesses online. This means that a business without a website is missing out on a huge chunk of potential sales — just because they do not have a website!

With this statistic in mind, it is crucial that your business has a website. However, just throwing up any old website with some graphics, links, and text that describes your business is not enough, either…


Since a young age I have been interested in technology and computers. I got my first computer — a fossil by today’s standards — at the age of 12, and I did what any 12-year-old with a shiny new computer would do: I took the machine apart! I wanted to know about the inner workings and what made the thing tick. As you can imagine, my father was super happy with this choice (sarcasm, much?)

As I grew up, I took an interest in the web and how it worked, and in high school I took courses in web design…


When it comes to developing effective sites, page load speed is crucial — especially for user that are visiting from mobile devices on their mobile carrier’s network speed. In 2021, Google ranks sites based on several factors — from Cumulative Layout Shifts to page load speeds and unused JavaScript that bloats the files and decreases loading time and performance. …


In front-end development, there are times when you are creating a login or a sign-up form and you want to give the user the option to show their password so that they can make sure that they typed everything correctly, rather than hiding it behind dots or asterisks. With Vanilla JavaScript, this is a remarkably simple design element to implement, and it can help add to the overall experience that your UI conveys.

Let’s take a look at how we would implement a password visibility toggler without the use of any libraries, using plain Vanilla JavaScript and HTML/CSS.

First, Let’s Handle the HTML & CSS

Before we…


If you have spent any time developing responsive web sites, I am sure that you, too have realized that getting your font size to scale to the size of the viewport without looking too small on smaller viewports and too large on larger viewports is not always easy. I have struggled with this issue a lot in my experience as a developer, and in order to solve the issue I have found myself adding media queries with just single selectors that will adjust the font size of certain elements based on the viewport size.

As you can imagine, this approach…


In today’s internet world, having a website is not enough. With over 50 percent of web users browsing the internet via mobile devices — from mobile phones to tablets and even smart watches — it is important for your website to be responsive and mobile friendly. Sure, you have heard this many times before — it is sort of an obvious “rule of thumb” nowadays. …


When I first started programming with JavaScript, my conditional logic statements were often comprised of massive amounts of nested if…else if…else statements. Initially, when writing these statements, they made sense because they walked through the logic step-by-step and the function executed properly based on the logic. Hoverer, weeks or months later when I needed to update or change the logic in my massive conditional blocks, I would have to parse through and understand the logic all over again. Even with the simplest functions, parsing through multiple levels of nested conditional logic was a difficult and time-consuming task. …


As you advance in your programming knowledge and start working on development teams either for an internship or as a part of a full-time development team, you are bound to use Sass in your coding career. With today’s modern web applications, CSS files are getting larger, more complex, and harder to maintain. One website or application can have several different styles and themes, which can lead to a lot of CSS rules that need to be defined. The advent of CSS preprocessors in recent years makes managing and organizing stylesheets much, much easier.

What are CSS Preprocessors?

A CSS preprocessor…


Ah..coding! Gotta love it!

In programming, there is a principle called Seperation of Concerns (or SoC, for short). In a nutshell, SoC means breaking code down to separate, individual components/functions/etc that each have a very specific purpose. By seperating code into individual functions, it makes the code easier to maintain and follow when reviewed, and it allows for much easier expansion to the code base.

Seperation of Concerns is a very broad topic when it comes to the programming world. Related to web development, we can consider SoC to be the reason why it is recommended that we separate our CSS, HTML, and JavaScript…


When writing code of any kind, it is extremely easy to end up with documents full of repetitive code. This is especially true for newbie developers, especially as apps continue to scale in size. The results are large documents that contain a ton of repetitive code. Larger files can slow down the load time of your website or application, and — most importantly — they are often very difficult to understand when they are reviewed in the future by you or other members of your development team.

One area where repetitive code seems to occur the most is in CSS…

Patrick J. McDermott

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